Green Matcha & Turmeric Drink

Recipe

2g fresh turmeric finely chopped (or 1 teaspoon organic dried)
1 g fresh ginger finely chopped (or ½ teaspoon organic dried)
1 teaspoon (2g) green matcha
1/8 tspn ground black pepper
Stevia to taste
¾ cup filtered water
2 tablespoons coconut oil
½ cup unsweetened coconut milk

Put turmeric, green matcha, ginger, pepper, stevia and water into a saucepan, bring to the boil and gentle simmer for 5 minutes. Then in a nutri bullet or blender put the coconut oil and coconut milk pour in the hot tea and blend until smooth and frothy.

Turmeric properties

Antiinflammatory, antioxidant, antiplatelet, cholagogue and hepatoprotective.
Traditionally used in the treatment of arthritis, asthma, cancer prevention, cardiovascular disease prevention, digestive weakness, liver insufficiency, hormonal imbalances, eczema and psoriasis. In recent studies it has also shown benefits in colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, allergies, arteriosclerosis, diabetes, liver cell injury, high cholesterol, pancreatic disease, eye disease, chronic inflammation, protecting DNA from damage, neurodegenerative diseases (such as alzheimer’s and dementia) and various cancers.
Turmeric aids mild digestive disturbances such as peptic ulcer, acidity, diarrhoea, flatulence and pain. It also helps with pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and other joint pain, minor biliary (gallbladder) and liver dysfunction (including fatty liver).
We all need tumeric!

Braun, L & Cohen, M, 2010, Herbs & Natural supplements an evidence based guide, 3rd ed, Elsevier, Australia, p. 897-907).
Thomsen, M & Gennat, H, 2009, Phytotherapy desk reference, 4th ed, Global Natural Medicine, Australia, p.44.

Green tea properties

Antioxidant, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic (anti cancer), astringent, digestive tonic, diuretic, hypocholesterolemic (lowers cholesterol).
Traditionally used for atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolaemia (high cholesterol), cancer prevention and liver protection. Recent studies have shown benefits in reducing LDL levels, antibacterial activity against many pathogenic gram negative and gram positive bacteria whilst protecting our good gut bacteria, antiviral activity (against HIV, epstein Barr virus, Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), influenza A and B, rotavirus and enterovirus (both cause gastroenteritis), anticarcinogenic activity in many cancers (lung, prostate, colon, stomach, pancreatic, bladder, oral, leukaemia, breast, cervical, bone and skin), alzheimer’s and dementia, inhibition of platelet aggregation (clotting), leptin inhibition thus suppressing appetite for weight loss, dental caries and gingivitis, diarrhoea, crohn’s disease and colitis, digestive symptoms, promotes alertness and cognitive performance and prevention of kidney stone formation.
We could all use a little green matcha!

Braun, L & Cohen, M, 2010, Herbs & Natural supplements an evidence based guide, 3rd ed, Elsevier, Australia, p. 572-579.
Thomsen, M & Gennat, H, 2009, Phytotherapy desk reference, 4th ed, Global Natural Medicine, Australia, p.34.

Ginger properties

Anti nausea, anti inflammatory, carminative (relaxes intestinal sphincter muscles and relieves flatulence), antiplatelet, demulcent (soothes inflamed surfaces of mucous membranes and skin), diaphoretic (promotes sweating during fever), expectorant (stimulates removal of excess mucous), metabolic stimulant (stimulates basal metabolic rate).
Traditionally used for nausea and vomiting (motion sickness, morning sickness, post operative, general nausea), poor peripheral circulation, migraine, rheumatic muscle disorders, fever, intestinal colic, flatulent dyspepsia, arthritis, dysmenorrhea (irregular periods) and endometriosis. Recent studies have found ginger to be useful for gastric ulcers (H.pylori), cholesterol lowering, antibacterial against many bacteria (even some antibiotic resistant bacteria), antifungal (candida albicans)l, antiviral (acyclovir-sensitive and resistant herpes simplex-1 and herpes simplex-2), antiparasitic (parasites in the intestinal tract), strongly antioxidant, liver and kidney cell protective, antitumor (apoptosis of cancer cells and suppression of proliferation of cancer cells), anti inflammatory, as effective as ibuprofen in relieving pain when used for a long period of time.
Ginger is amazing for our body!

Braun, L & Cohen, M, 2010, Herbs & Natural supplements an evidence based guide, 3rd ed, Elsevier, Australia, p. 480-489.
Thomsen, M & Gennat, H, 2009, Phytotherapy desk reference, 4th ed, Global Natural Medicine, Australia, p.108.

Black pepper

The primary purpose of including black pepper in the drink sachets is to increase the bioavailability of curcumin from turmeric, it was shown to increase its absorption by a whopping 2000%!

Shoba G, Joy D, Joseph T, Majeed M, Rajendran R & Srinivas PS, 1998, Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers, Lanta Med, vol 64(4), pp 357-6.

Coconut oil

Coconut contains lauric acid which is antiviral, antibacterial and an antifungal agent. It also contains medium chain fatty acids which are used differently in the body, they are used by the liver to as a source of energy, are harder for our body to convert to stored fat, it is easier for our body to burn them off than long chain fatty acids or triglycerides and have been found to reduce the unhealthy visceral fat (fat around internal organs) as well as induce modest reductions in body weight and composition without adversely affecting lipid profiles. However, more studies are needed to work out the exact dose to maintain healthy body composition and weight.

Mumme K &, Stonehouse W, 2015, Effects of medium-chain triglycerides on weight loss and body composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, J Acad Nutri Diet, vol. 115(2), pp. 249-63.

%d bloggers like this: